GRE Test


One Test for Graduate and Business School. More Opportunities for Success

Getting an advanced degree can generate many avenues. In fact, recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and The Organization for Economic Co-operation depicts how education pays in higher pay checks and lower unemployment rates.

Whether you are planning to go to graduate school or business school — or just exploring your options — you are taking an important stride toward your future. It is a smart move to show schools your potential and with the GRE revised General Test, you can! That's the Power of self-belief that can only be attained with the GRE revised General Test.

The GRE revised General Test gives you assurance to help you do your best. With the Test, you decide which scores you should send to schools. If you feel you didn't do your best on test day, its okay. You can retake the test and then send the scores you want schools to see. It's all part of the ScoreSelect option, only available with GRE Tests.

In addition to this, the GRE Test is the only admissions test for graduate or business school that permits you skip questions within a section, go back and change answers, and have control to tackle the questions within a section you want to answer first. The GRE revised General Test features question types that closely reflect the kind of thinking you'll carry out in graduate or business school.

Verbal Reasoning — Measures your ability to analyze and evaluate written material and amalgamate information obtained from it, examine relationships among component parts of sentences and identify relationships among words and concepts.

Quantitative Reasoning — Deals in problem-solving ability, throwing light on elementary concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis.

Analytical Writing — Measures critical thinking and analytical writing skills, especially your ability to articulate and support complex thoughts clearly and effectively.

Who Takes It?

Prospective graduate and business school aspirants from all around the world who are concerned in pursuing a master's, MBA, specialized master's in business or doctoral degree take the GRE revised General Test. Applicants come from different educational and cultural backgrounds and the GRE revised General Test provides schools with a common gauge for comparing candidates' qualifications.

GRE scores are used by admissions or administrative panels to enhance your undergraduate records, recommendation letters and other qualifications for graduate-level study.

When and Where Do People Take It?

The GRE revised General Test is available at more than 850 test centers in more than 160 countries. In most areas of the world, the computer-delivered test is available on a constant basis throughout the year. In Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Korea, the computer-delivered test is available one to three times per month. In areas of the world where computer-delivered testing is not available, the paper-delivered test is available up to three times a year in October, November and February.

Computer Based GRE Test


The overall duration for the computer-delivered GRE revised General Test is about 3 hours and 45 minutes. There are six sections with a 10-minute break following the 3rd section.

Blueprint of the Computer-Delivered Test

Measure

Number of Questions

Allotted Time

Analytical Writing
(One section with two separately timed tasks)

One "Analyze an Issue" task and one "Analyze an Argument" task

30 minutes per task

Verbal Reasoning
(Two sections)

20 questions per section

30 minutes per section

Quantitative Reasoning
(Two sections)

20 questions per section

35 minutes per section

Unscored

Varies

Varies

Research

Varies

Varies



An unidentified unscored section that does not count toward your score may be included and may emerge in any order after the Analytical Writing section. Questions in the unscored section are being tried out either for possible use in future tests or to ensure that scores on new editions of the test are comparable to scores from earlier editions.

An identified research section that does not count toward your score may be inculcated in place of the unscored section. The research section will always be visible at the end of the test. Questions in this section are included for ETS research purposes.

The Analytical Writing section will always be first. The Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and unidentified/unscored sections may follow the suit in any order. Therefore, you should treat each section as if it counts towards your score.

Test Design Features

The advanced adaptive design of the GRE revised General Test allows you to move back and forth throughout the whole section. Specific features consist of:

  • Preview and review capability within a section
  • "Mark" and "Review" characteristics to tag questions, so you can skip them and return later if you have time left over in the section
  • The ability to change/edit answers within a section
  • An on-screen calculator for the Quantitative Reasoning section

Test Content and Structure


The GRE revised General Test inculcates question types that closely reflect the kind of thinking you’ll do and the skills you need to excel in today's demanding graduate and business school programs. The test-taker friendly design lets you skip questions within a section, go back and modify answers and have the flexibility to choose which questions within a section you want to answer first. Take a look at the formation of the computer-delivered or paper-delivered GRE revised General Test.
The GRE revised General Test quantifies your verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking and analytical writing skills — skills that have been developed over a long period of time and are not related to a specific field of study but are essential for all. Here's a look at content covered in the three test sections — Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing.
Verbal Reasoning
The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to:
  • analyze and draw resolution from a dialogue; reason from incomplete data; spot author's assumptions and/or perspective; understand multiple levels of meaning, such as literal, figurative and author's intent
  • select important points; differentiate major from minor or relevant points; conclude text; understand the composition of a text
  • understand the meanings of words, sentences and entire texts; understand associations among words and among concepts

understand the meanings of words, sentences and entire texts; understand associations among words and among concepts The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to understand what you read and how you apply your reasoning skills.
Get a sneak preview of the Verbal Reasoning Question types.
Take a closer look at the Verbal Reasoning section, including sample questions with rationales, tips and more. Quantitative Reasoning
The Quantitative Reasoning section measures your skills to:
  • understand information pertaining to quant
  • understand and analyze quantitative information
  • solve problems using mathematical designs
  • apply fundamental mathematical expertise and elementary mathematical concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data interpretation
  • includes live scenarios
The Quantitative Reasoning section inculcates an on-screen calculator. If you are taking the paper-delivered test, a calculator will be provided at the test center.
Get a sneak preview of the Quantitative Reasoning Question types. Take a closer look at the Quantitative Reasoning section, including sample questions with rationales, tips and more.
Analytical Writing
The Analytical Writing section measures your ability to:
  • articulate complex thoughts precisely and effectively
  • support thoughts with significant ideologies and examples
  • examine claims and associated evidence
  • sustain a well-focused, rational discussion
  • control the essentials of standard written English

The Analytical Writing section requires you to facilitate with focused responses based on the tasks presented, so you can accurately demonstrate your skill in directly responding to a task.
Get a quick view of the Analytical Writing Question types.
Take a closer look at the Analytical Writing section, including sample questions with rationales, tips and more.
Modified Versions of Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning Questions
The test you take may inculcate questions that are altered versions of published questions or of questions you have already gazed upon on the test. Some modifications are significant; others are less noticeable.
Even if a question appears to be similar to a question you have already seen, it may in fact be different and have a different answer. Pay careful heed to the wording of each question.

Fairness & Validity


Fairness

Fairness concerns are an essential part of the development and scoring of all tests. The many aspects that ensure fairness include:
  • fairness evaluations by skilled reviewers
  • regular analyses of test questions to establish that questions do not unfairly contribute to group differences
  • rigorous training for all persons involved in the development or scoring of test questions to ensure that all examinees have an identical opportunity to demonstrate their skills and abilities
  • suitable accommodations (e.g., alternate test formats, extra time) for examinees who have disabilities or health-related requirements


Validity

Validity research and analyses establish that the test measures what it is supposed to evaluate. The GRE Program has documented evidence of the following types of validity in GRE tests:
  • create validity (the test measures the skills/abilities that should be measured)
  • content validity (the test measures appropriate content)
  • predictive validity (the test predicts success)
  • consequential validity (the test demonstrates that adverse consequences are minimal)
  • peripheral validity (the test has the expected relationship with other measures of the same construct)

Although Rising Careers works to build up validity evidence at each juncture of the delivery and scoring process, the initial impetus for validity research comes from feedback from members of the graduate school community, who provide information about the skills and abilities that they consider indispensable for success in graduate school.
Verbal Reasoning Measure The Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE revised General Test evaluates the verbal reasoning skills. These skills have been identified by graduate and business school deans and faculty as critical for success in graduate and business school. The capabilities that are assessed comprises of:
  • the ability to understand text (such as the ability to understand the inference of sentences, to conclude a text, or to differentiate key points from irrelevant points in a passage)
  • the ability to interpret a discussion (such as the ability to draw conclusions, to infer missing information or to identify assumptions)

Quantitative Reasoning Measure The Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE revised General Test assesses the quantitative reasoning skills. The skills assessed are constant with capabilities depicted in the Mathematical Association of America's Quantitative Reasoning for College Graduates: A Complement to the Standards and are based on feedback from faculty surveys. The capabilities that are assessed in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning measure include:
  • reading and understanding quantitative information
  • interpreting and analyzing quantitative information, including drawing inferences from data
  • using mathematical methods to solve quantitative problems

Fees for the GRE revised General Test and Related Services


Fees are stated in U.S. dollars.

Standard Test Administration  
GRE revised General Test — worldwide $195
Special Handling Requests  
Late registration fee (paper-delivered test online registration only) $25
Standby testing (paper-delivered test only) $50
Rescheduling fee $50
Changing your test center $50

Paper-delivered GRE revised General Test Content and Structure


The overall testing time for the paper-delivered GRE revised General Test is about 3 hours and 30 minutes. There are six sections with a 10-minute break following the 2nd section.
Composition of the Paper-delivered Test
Measure Number of Questions Allotted Time
Analytical Writing (Two sections) Section 1: "Analyze an Issue" task Section 2: "Analyze an Argument" task 30 minutes per task
Verbal Reasoning (Two sections) 25 questions per section 35 minutes per section
Quantitative Reasoning (Two sections) 25 questions per section 40 minutes per section

The Analytical Writing sections will always be first, while the other four sections may appear in any fashion.
Test Design Features
When taking a Verbal Reasoning or Quantitative Reasoning section, you are free, within that section, to skip questions and come back later or change the answer to a particular question as well.
There are paper-delivered equivalents for the majority of the question types, including text completions and numeric entry. Answers are entered into the test book, rather than a separate answer sheet.
You will be provided an ETS calculator to use during the Quantitative Reasoning section; you may not use your own calculator.

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